I was drawn to the London Metro newspaper a couple of weeks ago by the impressive double-sided cover advert profiling the new Asda Christmas campaign, which has taken the Christmas dinner to a new perspective, quite literally.  Some say a picture can tell a thousand words, well this portrays 27 diners and their dinners from an angel on a Christmas tree perspective. 

Outside front cover, making full use of every inch of the page

Outside front cover, making full use of every inch of the page

Look closely and you will see that not each plate is the same. The redheaded lady bottom left, who clearly loves the Brussels sprouts, next to the grandma who doesn’t seem to be eating vegetables at all, on the other side an empty chair since the boy has left his laden plate in favour of a toy. Meanwhile a pregnant Mum holds her bump contentedly while contemplating another plateful. A grandfather sleeps his meal off. While the all the famous stereotypes are there, but they have been presented in a totally different way.

I actually did not notice that it was a fold around until a little later, I was more interested in the validation quotes and marques.

I actually did not notice that it was a fold around until a little later, I was more interested in the validation quotes and marques.

It carries on inside, even down the motherly hostess bringing food to the table and the additional circle table on the end over flowing with calorific cakes and delicacies.

Christmas must be a difficult time for the supermarkets, how do you show off your wares without looking the same? Those hackneyed catalogues of Christmas hampers look dated, the traditional laden table with white tablecloths look old fashioned, and images of children or grandmas eating mince pies, just too familiar.

Of course this campaign displays the wide range of food, it’s a supermarket after all, but it allows a story to be told, or at least allows your imagination to interact and follow the link between the guests, or just wonder at the range of food. You feel you could be there.

What was equally impressive that on the same day, the display screen at Brighton Station showed the same advert with an arrow moving around showing the items and prices and you get the full spread on their website, which shows how you can be consistent across all formats.

The whole story - the digital version of the full spread on their website

The whole story - the digital version of the full spread on their website

What made it more impressive is that it was validated with a nice quote from Gillian Carter of the BBC Good Food Magazine Christmas Taste Awards, and a series of award marques. It is one thing to present the food beautifully, another to get that neutral external validation.

Of course the campaign was beyond the budgets of small business and organisations, but you can learn for their philosophy. How can you bring a different perspective to the products or services you produce? How can you present the interaction of your products or services with the customer?  How can you weave in the external validation, be it your customer or influencer?  Maybe you can produce your own visual feast to inspire interaction, engagement and sales.

Posted
AuthorGordon Kay